Your Horse's Myler Level

The Myler Level of any horse is based on his behaviour and experience. It's a gratuated system, meaning that as the horse learns, it earns more tongue relief. As you go up the Myler Levels, the correlating mouthpiece designs offer more tongue pressure. When the horse resists the bit, go softer not harsher.

Level One

  • Is young and inexperienced.
  • Is just beginning training.
  • Has a challenging disposition.
  • Is riding in a discipline that restricts bits to snaffle with jointed mouthpiece.

Level One mouthpieces apply the most tongue pressure and offer the least tongue relief. 

Level Two

  • Is young or green, just beginning training but with a steady disposition
  • Is older, just beginning training, training for a new discipline, or retraining after a long break.
  • If riding with a Level One mouthpiece and showing resistance. Has an unpredictable or challenging disposition.
  • Is a horse new to the rider with an unknown history. 

Level Two mouthpieces apply less tongue pressure than Level One and introduce some tongue relief. 

Level Two-Three
 

  • Basic training with a good behaviour: steady, honest and reliable, with good selfcontrol and can handle more tongue relief.
  • Advanced training but a challenging behaviour (anxious, aggressive or fearful).
  • Advanced training but a challenging behaviour (anxious, aggressive or fearful). May be training in a performance discipline that requires more tongue.
  • Riding in a Level Two mouthpiece and showing resistance. 

Level Two-Three mouthpieces are ported to offer tongue relief with varying degrees of potential tongue pressure. 

 Level Three 

  • Performance horse with advanced training and a solid disposition.
  • Experienced trail/ pleasure horse with a very solid/ trustworthy disposition and either mild or no control issues.
  • Has been riding in a Level Two-Three curb bit or correctional and showing  resistance. Has a calm steady disposition with either mild or no control issues.

Level Three mouthpieces offer maximum tongue relief .

Selecting a Myler mouthpiece 

Myler mouthpiece designs correspond to the Myler Level of a horse's behaviour and experience. The mouthpiece Levels start at Level 1, which apply maximum tongue pressure and go up to Level 3, which apply minimum tongue pressure and offer the most tongue relief. Some horses may never use a Level Three mouthpiece and that's ok. It's not about reaching the next Level. It's about finding the bit for your horse that gives him as much tongue relief as he can handle and give you the control and communication you want. 

Level One

  • Rotates on the tongue to apply tongue pressure. Collapses to form a  "U" instead of a "V" , protecting lips and bars from being pinched.
  • Curves to allow more room for the tongue, protects the lips and bars from being pinched.
  • Independent side movement on most of the mouthpieces.

Level Two

  • Offers tongue relief with either a small port or flexible  mouthpiece. Rotates on to the tongue to apply some tongue pressure.
  • Collapses to form a "U" instead of a "V" , protecting lips and bars from being pinched.  
  • Curves to allow more room for the tongue, protects the lips and bars from being pinched.  
  • Independent side movement on most of the mouthpieces.   

Level Two-Three

  • Ported, offering more tongue than Level One or Two Correctional mouthpieces that apply some tongue pressure or curb mouthpieces  that apply little tongue pressure. 
  • Uses more bar, poll, chin pressure than Level One or Two.
  • Curves to allow more room for the tongue. Options with and without independent side movement.   

Level Three

  • Curb bits with wider ports for maximum tongue relief, little to no tongue pressure. Uses primarily bar, poll and curb pressure.
  • Curves to allow more room fot the tongue.
  • Options with and without independent side movement.  

Important Note: Myler levels focus on the degree of tongue pressure or tongue relief offered by a mouthpiece. Be aware that other bit manufactures may have their own categories or levels based on different criteria, not to be confused with the Myler Levels.